Tagged: Naksa

Opinion: My Palestinian Family’s Land Was Stolen. Then It Showed Up On Airbnb. Op-Eds & Analysis
Ziad Alwan, Buzzfeed

Opinion: My Palestinian Family’s Land Was Stolen. Then It Showed Up On Airbnb.

"My children and I should be able to farm our land like my father did. Instead, Israeli settlers run a bed and breakfast on it."

on April 3, 2019
#Marking50 Series: Manal Videos
IMEU

#Marking50 Series: Manal

“I am Palestinian and I’m going to stay Palestinian forever. It doesn’t matter where I live or what passport I carry.” Displaced by Israel during the Naksa in 1967, Manal grew up as a refugee in Jordan. Today, Manal lives in Brooklyn and remains active on Palestinian, undocumented, Muslim, and Arab women's rights locally.

on June 26, 2017
#Marking50 Series: Ibrahim Videos
IMEU

#Marking50 Series: Ibrahim

“It was the worst scene ever when we were pushed out [by Zionist forces]. Only God knows how much I cried.” A Nakba survivor, 86-year-old Ibrahim lived through displacement in 1948 and has endured 50 years of Israeli occupation.

on June 6, 2017
#Marking50 Series: Fadwa Khalil Videos
IMEU

#Marking50 Series: Fadwa Khalil

Fadwa Khalil was 9 years old when Israel occupied the West Bank, pushing her family out of their home. It was the second time her family was displaced, after Israel forced them out them as part of the ethnic cleansing of 1948.

on June 5, 2017
Vanishing Palestine: The Making of Israel’s Occupation News Roundup
Al Jazeera

Vanishing Palestine: The Making of Israel’s Occupation

On June 5, 1967, an unprovoked Israel invaded Palestinian, Egyptian, and Syrian territories at once. Six days and over 300,000 Palestinian refugees later, it had occupied the Sinai Peninsula, Gaza Strip, West Bank, and Golan Heights. It has been 49 years since that day, and the West Bank and Golan Heights remain illegally occupied...

on June 5, 2016
New Evidence From 1967 War Reveals Israeli Atrocities News Roundup
Ilan Pappe, The Electronic Intifada

New Evidence From 1967 War Reveals Israeli Atrocities

In the wake of the June 1967 war, the Israeli author Amos Oz, then a reserve soldier in the Israeli army, together with a friend collated interviews with Israeli soldiers who participated in the war and asked them about the emotions the fighting triggered in them. The interviews were published as a book titled Conversations with Soldiers, more popularly referred at the time by my generation as the ”shooting and crying” book.

on June 23, 2015
{/exp:tag:entries}